Taking out the first Junior Hinkler Innovation Award were the St Luke's Year 12 Conrad Spirit of Innovation Team made up of Aiman Rahman, Zain Aslam, Murray Macpherson and Tyler De Been. Photo: Geordi Offord
Taking out the first Junior Hinkler Innovation Award were the St Luke's Year 12 Conrad Spirit of Innovation Team made up of Aiman Rahman, Zain Aslam, Murray Macpherson and Tyler De Been. Photo: Geordi Offord

Young innovators recognised for project to stop poverty

THEIR ambition to stop world hunger has been recognised by the Australian Red Cross and the World Health Organisation and now they’ve received the inaugural Junior Hinkler Innovation Award.

Local businessmen and woman gathered for breakfast at the Bundaberg Multiplex where the theme of this year’s Hinkler Innovation Series was AgTech where speakers spoke about the latest developments and the importance of AgTech innovation.

The 2020 event saw the first ever recipients of the Junior Hinkler Innovation Award.

Taking out the award were the St Luke’s Year 12 Conrad Spirit of Innovation Team made up of Murray Macpherson, Tyler De Been, Zain Aslam and Aiman Rahman.

The award was developed to inspire the same pioneering spirit of Bundaberg-born pilot Bert Hinkler.

The team invented Lifeboat, a floating hydroponic farming system to help solve poverty, starvation and food deficit problems in developing countries.

They placed fifth in the world in the Conrad Spirit of Innovation Awards.

Being a not-for-profit company with an aspiration to end world hunger, the World Health Organisation and Red Cross Australia have both been engaged and have shown early interest in the project.

The project was also awarded an innovation patent earlier this year.

Team member Zain Aslam said receiving the award was one of the “greatest opportunities”.

“The whole journey towards getting this has been amazing, being able to work with such great teammates has been the best time of my life and will be something I will remember for quite a long time,” he said.

Mr Aslam said the recognition was an open door for opportunities.

“It’s something not many people look into. The young minds of people are so full of ideas and creativity,” he said.

“If you can get these people recognised with what they achieve at school it’s giving them a pedestal to achieve what they can do after school and a spotlight to present their ideas and take those forward into the real world and develop solutions to problems.

“I feel like they (young innovators) are going to be the biggest driver for many things to come.”

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