Dawn Fraser has been appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC). Picture: Lachie Millard
Dawn Fraser has been appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC). Picture: Lachie Millard

Who made the Queen’s Birthday Honours List?

OLYMPIC golden girl Dawn Fraser, esteemed jeweller Wallace Bishop and the late guitarist Phil Emmanuel are among Queenslanders recognised in the Queen's Birthday 2018 Honours List.

Swim legend Fraser, 80, who was born in NSW but has called Noosaville home for almost a decade, was the only Queensland resident among 10 super achievers appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC).

This was in recognition of her "eminent service to sport, through ambassadorial, mentoring, and non-executive roles with a range of organisations at all levels, and to the community through roles in conservation and motoring associations''.

Across the country, an array of inspiring Australians have been recognised.

Cricketer Neil Harvey, now 89 and the last surviving member of Don Bradman's 1948 "Invincibles" team, has been awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM).

Comedian Tom Gleisner gained an Order of Australia (AO) for his charity work. Paralympian Kurt Fearnley, music historian Glenn A. Baker and fashion designers Linda Jackson and Jenny Kee were also awarded an Order of Australia.

RIP Phil Emmanuel, guitar legend. Photo: Cade Mooney Sunshine Coast Daily
RIP Phil Emmanuel, guitar legend. Photo: Cade Mooney Sunshine Coast Daily Cade Mooney/cm182216

Phil Emmanuel, a Buderim-based musician who died last month after a sudden asthma attack, has been recognised with an OAM for his service to music.

Other Queenslanders recognised include former Energex CEO, the late Terry Effeney, prostate cancer researcher Professor Suzanne Chambers, Antarctic explorer Sydney Kirkby and artist and engineer Natalie Jeremijenko.

Fraser said she was thrilled with the AC. She received an Officer of the order of Australia (AO) in 1998, and became a member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in 1967.

"When I opened the letter, the feeling was amazing. It was like winning my first gold medal,'' she said. "I'm so grateful and it's a great pleasure and honour.''

Fraser, who won eight Olympic medals including the 100m freestyle gold at three successive games, has been a champion for a range of groups, including disabled sportspeople and female athletes. She has never been far from the spotlight, always willing to speak her mind and take a stand to highlight issues close to her heart.

When accepting her Australian of the Year award in 1964 she said: "I have always been involved in a lot of controversy with officialdom, but I have always fought for something I believed in.''

Fraser was delighted to learn that there had been a significant increase in the number of women recognised in this year's Queen's Birthday Honours.

"I have been fighting for a number of years for women to get the acknowledgment they deserve, so this is absolutely fantastic,'' she said.

Fraser said such awards made her reflect on how big a part her parents played in shaping her future.

She said athletes could not succeed without the help of family and she wanted to thank the mums and dads who did the hard yards for their kids.

"No athlete can get through life today without the help of parents and they also ensure athletes keep a level head through their careers.''

Fraser maintains an active lifestyle on the Sunshine Coast, riding bikes and her jet ski, and says she loves spending time with grandson Jackson, 14. She said she had "many allegiances'' and while she supported the Blues in the State of Origin, also liked the Cowboys and Broncos. "I love living in Noosa,'' she said.