When puppy farm victims will be up for adoption

 

DOGS and puppies seized in a large RSPCA raid on alleged puppy farms this week could potentially be up for adoption in coming months.

The 78 dogs range in breeds from French bulldogs to golden retrievers to dachshunds and even "designer breeds" such as groodles - or golden retriever crossed with a poodle - and were seized from two Lockyer Valley properties on Tuesday.

They were among hundreds of dogs and puppies discovered following simultaneous raids by RSPCA Inspectors on four properties on the same road in what the RSPCA has described as a large-scale puppy farm operation.

Many of the dogs had medical issues or were living in inappropriate conditions, the inspectors said.

The seized dogs were all taken to the veterinary hospital at the RSPCA at Wacol for medical treatment or behavioural rehabilitation.

One Boston terrier was in a critical condition and had to receive an emergency blood transfusion on her arrival.

Gracie the Boston Terrier. Picture: RSPCA Queensland
Gracie the Boston Terrier. Picture: RSPCA Queensland

Daniel Young, RSPCA Chief Inspector, said it was not unusual to find various different breeds in alleged puppy farms.

"It's a commercial aspect, so they need to make money," he said.

"If they're going to make money, they're going to sell animals that are desirable to the public.

"They need to know what's in demand, so quite often these operations will have designer breeds and quite often purebred breeds."

RSPCA Qld Inspectors during raids of four properties west of Brisbane in relation to a puppy farm operation. Photos Supplied RSPCA
RSPCA Qld Inspectors during raids of four properties west of Brisbane in relation to a puppy farm operation. Photos Supplied RSPCA

Mr Young said it would be "a long road" before any of the animals would be possibly put up for adoption, including first sorting out legalities with the owners.

"We're in the very early stages of the investigation," he said.

"We need to ensure we get all relevant evidence, the animals treated and rehabilitated and get them out into loving and forever homes.

"We don't want to set these animals, or their new families, up to fail."

One of the dogs discovered during raids of four properties west of Brisbane in relation to a puppy farm operation. Picture: RSPCA
One of the dogs discovered during raids of four properties west of Brisbane in relation to a puppy farm operation. Picture: RSPCA

Mr Young said many needed long-term rehabilitation, including socialisation, before they could be rehomed.

"That can take time, particularly when there are behaviour issues, so we need to ensure all those animals are sound before they go out," he said.

Mr Young said some pet owners had asked if any of the dogs found on the properties were believed to be stolen.

"There is no evidence of missing or stolen dogs associated with any of the properties," he said.

More of the dogs discovered during recent RSPCA raids. Picture: RSPCA
More of the dogs discovered during recent RSPCA raids. Picture: RSPCA

Senior RSPCA Inspector Laura Finigan said anyone breeding dogs needed to ensure appropriate levels of care.

"The community expects, and the law requires, that dogs, as sentient beings, should be provided with appropriate exercise, socialisation and enrichment, and should be free to behave as dogs," she said.

One of the dogs rescued. Photos Supplied RSPCA
One of the dogs rescued. Photos Supplied RSPCA

Anyone hoping to adopt a dog through the RSPCA can apply at rspcaqld.org.au or visit this year's Big Adopt Out this weekend at the Brisbane showgrounds, 600 Gregory Tce, Bowen Hills.