BEAUTIFUL SIGHT: Paul Balfe captured this 88-image composite of the Geminid meteor shower above Brisbane previously.
BEAUTIFUL SIGHT: Paul Balfe captured this 88-image composite of the Geminid meteor shower above Brisbane previously.

Stargazers: How to get glimpse of a meteor shower overnight

IF YOU'RE looking for live entertainment on an astronomical level, now is the time to look up.

The Orionids, a meteor shower from Halley's Comet, is set to peak on October 21 and it's viewable in both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere.

According to NASA Science, it's considered to be one of the "most beautiful showers of the year" with meteors travelling able 66km/s into Earth's atmosphere.

The website suggests stargazers in the Southern Hemisphere lay flat on their back with their feet facing northeast.

While the shower is best viewed between midnight and dawn, you need to be patient as your eyes adapt to the dark.

According to the website, within 30 minutes in the dark your eyes will adapt and you may start to see meteors.

Meteor showers occur regularly and yet often efforts to see them can be fruitless; but if you don't look, you definitely won't see them.

Halley's Comet takes about 76 years to orbit the sun once and was last spotted by casual observers in 1986.

It will not enter the inner solar system again until 2061.

As stated by NASA Science, the comet is named in honour of Edmond Halley, who discovered in 1705 that three previous comets seemed to return about every 76 years and suggested that they were all the same comet.

The shower is said to be active from October 2 to November 7.

 

 

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