REMEMBER: Bob Boogaart is proud of his Armistice Day collectors items and is urging everyone to pay their respects on the centenary this Sunday.
REMEMBER: Bob Boogaart is proud of his Armistice Day collectors items and is urging everyone to pay their respects on the centenary this Sunday. TAHLIA STEHBENS

Reflecting on 100 years after WWI

BOB Boogaart is a proud Australian man, and when he saw an honorary supplement of The Sun's Armistice Day front page at a garage sale, he couldn't help but buy it.

"I could see the importance of it,” Mr Boogaart said.

"This is what came out on Monday, 11 November 1918, and the other side came out on November 12, the day after Armistice Day.

"The stories are just mind-blowing. For 100 years ago, it's not that long ago, and what they went through and how they talked, it's just like they talk from the stone age.”

The pages he owns were printed in 1968 on the 50th anniversary, and he is proud as punch to still have them in fine condition another 50 years later.

"They were just folded up pieces of paper when I bought them, and I unfolded them and have laid them out to help preserve them,” Mr Boogaart said.

Remembrance Day is a time held close to Mr Boogaart's heart, and he believes his parents' own journey to Australia from Holland in 1950 has encouraged that passion.

"It's important to nearly everyone in the whole world,” he said.

"So many countries were involved in the First World War and it's important to nearly everyone.

"I think everybody should stop for the minute's silence because what they did created, more or less, what we've got now.”

Mr Boogaart believes everybody should be thankful and respectful of the history of war. He also sports some 30 folders of old wartime music that would have been played.

He said he hadn't heard the music played, but revelled at the opportunity, saying the experience would be "pretty mind-blowing”.

"This is history,” he said.

"When the troops were over fighting, they would have got around the piano and sung songs, and I'm a bit lost for words at people's stories.”

Mr Boogaart understood the younger generations of today often didn't understand the sacrifices made back then, but urged all Bundaberg residents, young and old, to participate in a moment of remembrance.

"I think everybody should feel a connection to this time,” he said.

"This sort of thing is in your blood, because it's part of your past, and it's part of my past.”