CAUSE CLOSE TO HOME: Paiton Dryden shaved her head to show support for those diagnosed with cancer, including two of her family members.
CAUSE CLOSE TO HOME: Paiton Dryden shaved her head to show support for those diagnosed with cancer, including two of her family members. contributed

Paiton joins region's battle to beat cancer

A YOUNG woman who was inspired to help those closest to her who had been touched by cancer has raised more than $800 for the World's Greatest Shave.

Paiton Dryden, 18, started fundraising for the cause while working at Walla Street Cafe, in an effort to show support for both her great grandmother and great great uncle who are suffering with Mesothelioma.

"Cancer touches everyone, family and friends. For me it's my Great Grandmother and Great Great Uncle who are both suffering with Mesothelioma. This is my way of contributing to finding a cure,” Paiton said.

"I feel so happy that I have done something that will help so many others in the hope for a cure.”

Paiton's grandmother Kaylene Dryden said her granddaughter wanted to support those in her community.

"She is so proud she has achieved what she's done and really happy with it all,” Ms Dryden said.

Paiton Dryden and mum Aimee Dryden before Paiton shaved her hair in a fundraising effort.
Paiton Dryden and mum Aimee Dryden before Paiton shaved her hair in a fundraising effort. contributed

Paiton's efforts come as new Cancer Council Queensland statistics reveal around 1700 Wide Bay Burnett residents suffer from some form of cancer each year.

Of those, about 570 people die from the disease.

Cancer Council Queensland's Viertel Cancer Research Centre have now released their 2015 data and trends, the most recent available data from the Queensland Cancer Register.

The data shows the incidence, survival, mortality and prevalence of certain cancers in the region.

Cancer Council Queensland CEO Chris McMillan said the data showed the top five most commonly diagnosed cancers in the Wide Bay-Burnett region were prostate cancer, melanoma, colorectal cancer, lung cancer and breast cancer.

"Over 280 local men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year ... Melanoma is the second most common cancer in the region, with around 220 people diagnosed each year,” Ms McMillan said.

"About 210 locals are diagnosed with colorectal cancer each year in the region, and around 170 local women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year.”

Ms McMillan said lung cancer remained the region's biggest cancer killer with about 180 diagnoses and 130 deaths a year.

Overall, the number of cancers diagnosed each year in Queensland has more than tripled in the past three decades, from 8298 cases in 1982 to about 27,788 cases in 2015.

"While survival rates are improving, if current trends continue into the future, cancer will remain the leading burden of disease...” Ms McMillan said.