BUNDABERG WHALE WATCHING: Ian Brookfield and Jade Lui on board the Emelie.
BUNDABERG WHALE WATCHING: Ian Brookfield and Jade Lui on board the Emelie. Mike Knott BUN270918WHALE1

New whale watching business to blow tourism out of the water

BUNDABERG is in for a whale of a time after the arrival of the city's first whale watching-dedicated tour.

Ocean lovers living in the Rum City can book a four-hour tour to see the marine animals as soon as today, with yesterday's launch of the Bundaberg Whale Watching website.

Owner Ian Brookfield said the venture was one he'd hoped to achieve in Bundaberg for some time now, admitting his surprise no current full-time whale watching tours existed in the immediate area.

"I don't think anyone has seriously looked at full-time (and exclusive) whale watching tours in Bundaberg," Mr Brookfield said.

"Yes some have put their toe in the water, but not on a permanent, full-time (and only whale watching-dedicated) basis."

Lady Musgrave Experience offers a number of tours to visitors and locals in Bundaberg, including whale watching tours.

The operator also runs tours to Lady Musgrave Island.

MR Brookfield told the NewsMail the Rum City's relatively untapped potential in the whale watching industry was exciting and something he hoped to build on.

"There's not a week goes by somebody doest see whales (in the region). Everything is at our doorstep but no one is picking up the baton and running with it," Mr Brookfield said.

"I've been working like crazy on this and I'm very committed to building tourism here."

Bundaberg Whale Watching is offering two four-hour tours a day, seven days a week depending on weather conditions.

Each tour can fit up to 68 people.

Current estimates suggest about 30,000 whales are expected to migrate up and down the east coast this year, according to the Department of Environment and Science.

"In the unlikely event we don't see whales, we'll give customers a return ticket to go again," Mr Brookfield said.

Current estimates suggest about 30,000 whales are expected to migrate up and down the coast this year, according to the Department of Environment and Science.

"We've drawn on local knowledge ... from Bundy boaties and fishermen, and they'll come out on our first few trips as we plot the initial locations," Mr Brookfield said.

"We just have to pick up on their migrating path so we know which route they'll take."

The whale watching season runs from July to November.