Adam Harland.
Adam Harland.

Man threatens to burn down neighbour's house

ADAM Harland and his neighbours aren't the best of friends.

Harland pleaded guilty in the Bundaberg Magistrates Court yesterday to a breach of bail which detailed that he would not have contact with his next-door neighbour.

Police prosecutor Sergeant Dean Burgess described the confrontation as a "heated neighbourhood dispute" in which Harland threatened to burn down his neighbour's house.

People sitting in the gallery, clearly invested in the sentence, had to be separated by the magistrate after a verbal argument threatened to break out.

"I accept that there's animosity between you and your neighbour," Magistrate Bronwyn Hartigan said, but explained that it did not excuse Harland's behaviour.

The court understood that Harland had placed himself at risk of jail for his behaviour, something not at all helped by his seven page long criminal history.

While his criminal history is lengthy, Ms Hartigan noted Harland had been taking steps to improve himself, though he admitted to some adverse behaviour.

"I do smoke a little bit of pot and for that I apologise," Harland said.

Harland was under threat of a three-month sentence which was previously suspended for three years, something Ms Hartigan described as an "outrageous" length of time.

Such was the length of the suspended sentence that Ms Hartigan believed it to be disproportionate to extend it further.

Harland was sentenced to 50 hours community service to take place over the next 12 months and was held in the courtroom until the rising of the court.

"The reality is you'd do well to stop smoking marijuana because the police know where you live," Ms Hartigan said.

Harland pleaded guilty to a breach of bail condition which detailed that he would not have contact with his next-door neighbour.

Police prosecutor Sergeant Dean Burgess described the confrontation as a "heated neighbourhood dispute" in which Harland threatened to burn down his neighbour's house.

Parties sitting in the gallery, clearly invested in the sentence, had to be separated by the Magistrate after a verbal argument threatened to break out.

"I accept that there's animosity between you and your neighbour," Magistrate Bronwyn Hartigan said, but explained that it did not excuse Harland's behaviour.

The court understood that Harland had placed himself at risk of jail for his behaviour, something not at all helped by his seven page long criminal history.

While his criminal history is lengthy, Ms Hartigan noticed Harlan had been taking steps to improve himself, though he admitted to some adverse behaviour.

"I do smoke a little bit of pot and for that I apologise," Harland said.

Harland was under threat of a three month sentence which was previously suspended for three years, something Magistrate Bronwyn Hartigan described as an "outrageous" length of time.

Such was the length of the suspended sentence that Ms Hartigan believed it to be disproportionate to extend it further.

Harland was sentenced to 50 hours community service to take place over the next 12 months and was held in the courtroom until the rising of the court.

"The reality is you'd do well to stop smoking marijuana because the police know where you live," Ms Hartigan said.