WHAT A NIGHT: Project Night Life team members Janet Brennan of MRH Lawyers, WBHHS simulation trainer Dean Little, WBHHS clinical director AODS Dr Kees Nydam, WBHHS clinical nurse AODS Nicole Blackley, WBHHS nurse educator Annie McKay, WBHHS occupational therapy assistant Lee-Ann Napier, WBHHS executive liaison officer Traci Thornton, QPS district crime prevention co-orindator Danielle Loftus and WBHHS donation specialist nurse Martin Brennan.
WHAT A NIGHT: Project Night Life team members Janet Brennan of MRH Lawyers, WBHHS simulation trainer Dean Little, WBHHS clinical director AODS Dr Kees Nydam, WBHHS clinical nurse AODS Nicole Blackley, WBHHS nurse educator Annie McKay, WBHHS occupational therapy assistant Lee-Ann Napier, WBHHS executive liaison officer Traci Thornton, QPS district crime prevention co-orindator Danielle Loftus and WBHHS donation specialist nurse Martin Brennan.

Life at night made safer

A BUNDABERG initiative may not have taken out any national awards, but our teenagers are still the big winners, with the project's merit recognised through four finalist nominations.

Yesterday at the Australian Road Safety Awards in Melbourne, Project Night Life, which aims to educate Year 12 students to help them make informed decisions as they transition into adulthood, was up against some serious competition.

The program, a joint collaboration between the Queensland Police Service's Bundaberg Patrol Group, Bundaberg Hospital, Bundaberg Bargara Liquor Accord, MRH Lawyers and Bridges, was a national finalist in four categories, community programs, school programs, innovation and state government initiatives.

As part of the program, students attend Bundaberg Hospital where they are exposed to and participate in an Emergency Department trauma scenario, a real-life trauma story from a young person involved in a fatigue-related road accident, organ donation and intensive care unit presentation, occupational therapy rehabilitation and road safety awareness.

Bundaberg police district crime prevention co-ordinator Senior Constable Danielle Loftus said to be named a national finalist was a huge achievement.

"It's a fantastic achieve for everyone who's been involved, from the stakeholders to the student participants who we also learn from and encourage us to continue with the program,” she said.

"November 2013 was when we first piloted the program.”

Snr Const Loftus said all secondary schools in the region were invited to get involved and the feedback from the students showed how much they took away from the program.

"Think before acting”, "It was a big wake up call”, "It gives you a new perspective, "Life after an accident is challenging”, "Common sense is the key”, "Poor choices lead to life regrets”, "It made me stop and think”, were just some of the comments made by students who took part in the program.

Snr Const Loftus said program co-ordinators were now awaiting the announcement of Alcohol and Drug Foundation Local Drug Action Team funding, and if successful the program would continue this year.