ANTHONY Mundine's hopes of a final big pay day have been virtually extinguished by Jeff Horn's manager.

Speaking the morning after Horn's emphatic loss to Terence Crawford, Dean Lonergan was asked about the possibility of a Mundine-Horn match-up

"It appeals to me like six cups of warm sick. Quite seriously there are great fights to be had over here in the welterweight division," said Lonergan

"Bob Arum has said that Jeff would go well against the other welterweights out there. The reality is Terence Crawford is one of Boxing' greats, as good or better than Sugar Ray Leonard according to Arum.

"It actually makes Jeff's performance all the better. So a Mundine fight would be a step-back in credibility

"Tell Mundine the fight won't happen, there is no way I am going to let Mundine run the promotion because at the end of the day I'm the one paying the bills.

"Mundine has recently being talking about racism in the media and how Horn gets all the support in the media. Please.

"I have heard nothing but what a good bloke he is but as soon as you put a microphone in front of him, all this garbage comes out."

Lonergan said he was leaving Las Vegas for Los Angeles this week and would soon have a deal in place for Horn to fight by November or December this year against a top American.

Horn's preference is to fight in Australia rather than travel to America again.

Lonergan says there is a long list of candidates for the Horn return ahead of Mundine - all American welterweights.

Anthony Mundine is unlikely to be Horn’s next opponent
Anthony Mundine is unlikely to be Horn’s next opponent

Top of the list is controversial Adrian Broner, Jessie Vargas who lost the WBO title to Manny Pacquiao in 2016 and the winner of the August fight between Danny Garcia and Shawn Porter for the WBC title.

 

But Mundine and his adviser Emaid Dib, brother of former world featherweight champ Billy Dib, are pitching their own offer to the Horn family and believe both fighters could top $2 million in purses.

``The Mundine fight really makes so much sense for both parties,'' Dib said. ``I really don't understand Dean Lonergan pouring cold water on it and suggesting to fight another big name American. That's easy for him to say that when he isn't copping the punches.

``We are not playing games with negotiations and want to be straight forward.

``Anthony genuinely wants to turn a page with being a role model and will win people over by being humble win or lose to Horn.''

Horn leaves Las Vegas today for a three-week holiday in Canada and said he was open to all offers.

Terence Crawford (L) hits Jeff Horn
Terence Crawford (L) hits Jeff Horn

He told News Corp that the first fight he ever saw was Anthony Mundine's win over Danny Green in 2006 and he would love the chance to beat the boxer who was king of the sport when he was a young amateur starting out.

Horn's father Jeff Snr said it was still early days in the regrouping effort after the savage loss to Crawford but the idea of a seven-figure payday against Mundine was much more appealing to him than ``$300,000 to fight another top American in America.''

Horn's trainer Glenn Rushton said ``all offers were being considered'' and would not rule out a Horn-Mundine battle in Brisbane.

Interestingly earlier this year Australia's greatest trainer Johnny Lewis, the coach of six world champs including Jeff Fenech, Kostya Tszyu and Billy Dib, advised Horn not to fight Crawford but to tackle Mundine instead before leaving the 66.68kg welterweight division for the more comfortable realm of the 70kg junior-middleweights.

He believes a Horn-Mundine fight would intrigue the country with the crafty old lion going in against the hungry young bull.

Of all the doom and gloom out of Las Vegas, the best news for Horn came from his opponent Terence Crawford.

Terence Crawford (R) throws a right at Jeff Horn
Terence Crawford (R) throws a right at Jeff Horn

Typically gracious Horn was realistic about the mountain he has to climb to defeat a Terence Crawford.

There was even unrealistic talk of a re-match, something that won't happen given Crawford will have bigger fish to fry, but the brash American did offer some encouragement.

"We were sitting next to each other after the fight when the doctors were checking us out, and he said "oh man, you punched the hell out of me in there"," said Horn.

"I said 'hang on, I've got cuts all over me, look at me', He was gracious, a lot better than he was before the fight.

"I still feel I have plenty more to prove but good on Crawford, he has done very well. I feel like I didn't show all of my skills last night. He's a great fighter, extremely fast and very accurate with his punches."

Horn hopes to be back in the ring before Christmas with a range of opponents to be looked at, most likely a US world ranked fighter. He plans to fight until he is 35.