Heartbreaking figures reveal most likely drowning victims

 

QUEENSLAND holds a heartbreaking record - with more children age four or under drowning than in any other state.

There has been an increase in drownings in the sunshine state, with 64 people losing their lives in the water last financial year.

Hotter summers are driving more people into the water, dramatically increasing the number of deaths, according to the Royal Life Saving Australia National Drowning Report released this morning.

The hottest summer on record last year lead coincided with more drowning deaths, the Royal Life Saving Australia national drowning report found. Photo: Cameron Ward
The hottest summer on record last year lead coincided with more drowning deaths, the Royal Life Saving Australia national drowning report found. Photo: Cameron Ward

And if you're a man aged 18 to 34 or 45 to 64 your at the most risk.

There were nine children aged under four that drowned in Queensland, compared to five in NSW and three in Victoria.

The devastating figures have sparked calls from Royal Life Saving Queensland boss Paul Barry for parents to do more to supervise their children around the water and check the fence around their pool and dams.

He said 32 per cent of drownings in Queensland were young adults aged 18-34, while 22 per cent were aged 45 to 64.

"The report reinforces the importance of ensuring all Australians have the swimming and water safety skills to enjoy our beautiful waterways safely" Mr Barry said.

Just last year the Courier-Mail and Sunday Mail secured state and Federal funding last year for swimming and survival skills to be taught at all schools.

There were 276 drownings across the nation in 2017-18, with about a quarter of them in Queensland.

The hottest summer on record last year lead coincided with more drowning deaths, the Royal Life Saving Australia national drowning report found. Picture: Adam Yip
The hottest summer on record last year lead coincided with more drowning deaths, the Royal Life Saving Australia national drowning report found. Picture: Adam Yip

The 64 people who drowned in Queensland was a slight increase on the previous year.

The seven drownings which occured in flood events all occured in the Queensland.

The report found that the hottest summer on record led to a 17 per cent increase in summer

drowning deaths, 123 people, when compared with the 10-year average.

More people drowned in rivers, creeks or streams in Queensland, 25 people, than at the beach or swimming pool.