With Valentine's Day coming up, The Observer talked to two Rural Fire Brigade couples about what love was like on the front line.
With Valentine's Day coming up, The Observer talked to two Rural Fire Brigade couples about what love was like on the front line.

Firey couples reveal what love is like on the front line

People have heard the expression "walking through fire for someone" but for these two couples it's a reality.

With Valentine's Day coming up, The Observer talked to two Rural Fire Brigade couples about what love was like on the front line.

Pat and Errol Noye have volunteered for the Turkey Beach Rural Fire Brigade since 2006 and in August they will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary.

The couple has fought many bushfires together, but the key events that stick out in Pat's mind were the Deepwater, Collosseum, and Lowmead bushfires.

Pat and Errol Noye have volunteered for the Turkey Beach Rural Fire Brigade since 2006 and in August they will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary.
Pat and Errol Noye have volunteered for the Turkey Beach Rural Fire Brigade since 2006 and in August they will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary.

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With Errol as the brigade's first officer, Pat said he was often on the front lines.

"I don't go out in the trucks much anymore," Pat said.

"When he was fighting those fires I was in incident control and was arranging crews to go out to the fires.

Pat and Errol Noye have volunteered for the Turkey Beach Rural Fire Brigade since 2006 and in August they will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary.
Pat and Errol Noye have volunteered for the Turkey Beach Rural Fire Brigade since 2006 and in August they will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary.

"There a couple of times when you hear on the radio things getting hairy and it can get quite stressful."

Last year Errol was deployed to fight the New South Wales' bushfires.

"I did worry about him then because the fires are much more intense than what we have here," she said.

"You are on the edge of your seat but with mobile phones now it is great, he rang me every night and told me what he's been up to.

"It's hard when you are not there with them because you don't know what's going on."

The same could be said for couple Peter and Sarah Jackson, who work as Mount Maurice rural fire brigade volunteers.

Peter and Sarah Jackson, who work as Mount Maurice rural fire brigade volunteers.
Peter and Sarah Jackson, who work as Mount Maurice rural fire brigade volunteers.

The pair met five years ago at a Calliope park burn, where Peter was the first officer at Mount Maurice Fire Brigade and Sarah Jackson, nee Lara, was a Calliope Rural Fire Brigade volunteer.

The pair married two years ago, and now have a little girl.

Sarah said she also worried about her partner, and recounted the Mount Larcom fire which was headed for Gladstone.

Peter and Sarah Jackson, who work as Mount Maurice rural fire brigade volunteers.
Peter and Sarah Jackson, who work as Mount Maurice rural fire brigade volunteers.

"There had been times when he goes out where I'm always worried," Sarah said.

"That fire was hectic enough and looked like it was heading towards the town, we were literally in it.

"Most fires I do worry about him because he gets in it, he's not someone who stands back."

Sarah said the key to a strong marriage was to have "something big" in common.

"If you have something in common, I think you understand each other more," she said.

Pat said compromise, being there for each other, listening and not going to bed angry was the key to marriage.

"Just be there for one another, that is the most important thing," Pat said.

"I wouldn't trade (Errol) for anything, we're a team."