On the weekend, the Datsun Sports Owners Association of Queensland visited Toowoomba.
On the weekend, the Datsun Sports Owners Association of Queensland visited Toowoomba.

Datsun Fairladys roll into town after major event cancelled

WITH major events cancelled this year due to COVID-19, many groups and organisations are finding other ways to meet and celebrate.

At the weekend, the Datsun Sports Owners Association of Queensland visited Toowoomba with 10 Datsun Fairladys making a stop in the Garden City.

The club's national meet was due to be held last month with 50 owners and their cars gathering together, along with fans of the European-style sports car.

However, it was cancelled just like many events around the country.

On the weekend, the Datsun Sports Owners Association of Queensland visited Toowoomba. Bill Cahill with his restored 1965 Datsun Fairlady.
On the weekend, the Datsun Sports Owners Association of Queensland visited Toowoomba. Bill Cahill with his restored 1965 Datsun Fairlady.

But club secretary Michael Tresillian said with recently lifted travel restrictions, they instead decided to go for a weekend drive together with those who could make it.

"It allowed us to get out in our cars for a long drive, catch up with good friends we've not seen for months and hopefully contribute somewhat to local economies," he said.

The group travelled from Brisbane to Toowoomba, taking a scenic drive through Mt Glorious to Esk via Somerset Dam, then headed through Ravensbourne to Highfields.

On the weekend, the Datsun Sports Owners Association of Queensland visited Toowoomba. Michael Tresillian with his son Oliver and their 1969 Datsun Sports 2000.
On the weekend, the Datsun Sports Owners Association of Queensland visited Toowoomba. Michael Tresillian with his son Oliver and their 1969 Datsun Sports 2000.

In Highfields, they stopped for a barbecue at councillor Bill Cahill's house who is also a Datsun Fairlady owner.
From there they finished by staying the night at the Glen Worth Hotel.

"Given there are about 100 registered cars in Australia, we probably had 10% of them staying in Toowoomba on Saturday," he said.

"We had to keep the crowd under 20 people, though, to fit in with current public health recommendations which we did as most cars had one driver.

"More than ever, Australian tourism needs as much support as it can get.

"While we are a small club, taking the opportunity to enjoy our local region and support local tourism in any way makes sense.

"The national meet won't be able to happen, but we can channel our energy into local events that provide good entertainment to our members, support local communities."

Mr Tresillian said talking to other members of the club they came to the agreement that the Datsun Fairladys were a hidden treasure and the lucky few who possessed them understood the raw attraction of the classic vehicle.