The rose-crowned fruit dove is often difficult to see and best detected by listening for their loud
The rose-crowned fruit dove is often difficult to see and best detected by listening for their loud "woo-up-woo" call.

COLOURFUL CHARACTER: A bird as beautiful as any flower

One of the most beautiful birds that can be seen around Bundaberg is the rose-crowned fruit-dove.

It is a small, compact dove, with a short tail and rounded wings. Its name comes from the deep rose cap on the forehead, which is bordered by a narrow yellow stripe.

The upper body of the male is bright green and the under-body orange and yellow with a rose-coloured patch.

The throat and upper breast is rough grey. In flight, dark underwings contrast with the yellow body and band on the end of the tail.

The female is similar, but lighter in colour.

 

The rose-crowned fruit dove.
The rose-crowned fruit dove.

The juvenile is mostly green without the rose crown and orange under-body but does have a yellow eye stripe and is yellow under the tail.

This species is also known as Pink Cap, Rose- or Red-crowned Fruit-Pigeon.

They are found in coastal tall tropical and sub-tropical forests, particularly with dense vine growth as well as in rainforest with many fruiting trees. They feed in the canopy of rainforest, mainly in the morning or late afternoon.

They swallow fruit whole and particularly like figs and the fruit of other species of rainforest trees, palms and vines.

They get their water from leaves or dew and do not take water from the ground.

Courting is the typical bowing display of pigeons, tucking in the head and displaying the rose cap.

After mating they build a frail, loosely woven cup of twigs and tendrils. Both birds incubate, but predators often take the single egg.

They are often difficult to see and best detected by listening for their loud "woo-up-woo" call.

Best places to see it would be Moore Park, Barolin Environment Area at Mon Repos and Smith's Crossing at Kolan River.

Listen for the call and look up into the canopy.

Aussie Backyard Bird Count results

Bundaberg put in an outstanding performance at the Aussie Backyard Bird Count which concluded last month.

An extract of the species and birds counted for coastal centres from Noosa to Mackay shows that Bundaberg recorded the most species as well s the highest total number of birds.

Results:

• Bundaberg: 221 species, 18,233 birds

• Noosa: 125 species, 2,226 birds

• Maryborough: 180 species, 10,745 birds

• Gladstone: 175birds, 11,848 species

• Capricorn Coast: 121 species, 4,946 birds

• Mackay: 191 species, 16,373 birds

Allan Briggs is the secretary of BirdLife Capricornia, contact him with your bird questions at abriggs@irock.com.au