Bundaberg's RACQ LifeFlight Rescue helicopter.
Bundaberg's RACQ LifeFlight Rescue helicopter.

Calls for caution after spike in motorbike crashes

With two weeks of holidays about to begin, RACQ LifeFlight Rescue is urging motorcyclists to be more vigilant when taking to the road or trail.

The plea comes as crews respond to an increased number of call outs.

RACQ LifeFlight Rescue Director of Aeromedical Services, Dave Donaldson said in roughly 12 weeks, their choppers had responded to about 30 motorbike crashes, which is about a 30 per cent increase on the same time last year.

On average, RACQ LifeFlight Rescue crews are treating almost three people a week, who have been seriously injured in a motorbike crash.

"The nature of the injuries, sustained by these patients, are often quite serious and will see the patient transported to a Brisbane hospital for specialised care," Mr Donaldson said.

Nine of the total number of motorbike crashes attended by RACQ LifeFlight Rescue crews, over the past 12 weeks, occurred across the Wide Bay Burnett region.

In July, an injured woman and her husband were flown to hospital, after their motorbike crashed, south of Bundaberg.

According to LifeFlight, it's believed they were riding around a corner, when they lost control and came off the bike.

"With Queenslanders expected to make the most of the warmer weather over the coming weeks, RACQ LifeFlight Rescue is calling on the community to take extra care when enjoying their petrol fuelled fun," Mr Donaldson said.

RACQ spokesperson Lauren Ritchie said motorcyclists are particularly vulnerable because they're not as visible and do not have the same level of protection as other motorists.

"Motorists can help prevent serious motorbike crashes by giving motorcyclists space and double checking your blind spots, particularly when changing lanes," Ms Ritchie said.

"We also urge riders to protect themselves on the roads, by wearing quality safety gear, making sure they're visible to all road users, are riding to the conditions and sticking to the speed limit, and are taking plenty of rest breaks on long trips."