Wendy Walters felt compelled to speak out about her experience, saying the housing crisis for older women should have been planned for.
Wendy Walters felt compelled to speak out about her experience, saying the housing crisis for older women should have been planned for. Mike Knott BUN240117SMART3

Bundy woman offers Wendy a cheap home

WHEN Kathline Hewerdine read about a fellow woman struggling, she knew she could offer a solution.

The NewsMail's story in Saturday's paper on Wendy Walters, 63, told of her fear of burdening her children with her financial woes after moving to Bundaberg to spend time with her grandchildren and struggling to find work.

Wendy's story reflected a looming "crisis” in housing for older single women across Australia.

Mrs Hewerdine, 85, who owns a duplex in Avoca, has offered Ms Walters one half of her home.

Her current tenant - her second in 15 years - is soon to depart.

"I'll give her less than $200 rent, and if she can get in and do some gardening I'll drop it even further,” Mrs Hewerdine said.

"At the moment I pay a gardener. I've just lost my husband of 65 years so it would be nice to have some company.

"It's not far from the shops and it's up high, it doesn't flood.”

Ms Walters was very grateful and said she would give Mrs Hewerdine a call.

After working in community services "looking after people who aren't as lucky as me”, she said she felt duty bound to speak out.

"I'm the poorest, so to speak, I've ever been,” Ms Walters said.

"I had some savings when I got here but it's just about gone; and women of my era didn't get super - so I don't have a heap to live on.

"This issue has been coming up for years and nobody has planned for it - there is not enough affordable housing.

"I would love to find somewhere I can stay and rent forever. Trying to find somewhere decent and safe that won't be sold out from under me (is hard).”