Allan Briggs talks about the white-throated honeyeater and how you can attract them to your garden.
Allan Briggs talks about the white-throated honeyeater and how you can attract them to your garden.

BIRD OF THE WEEK: How to attract honeyeaters to your yard

Honeyeaters are one of the largest groups of birds in Australia with over 90 species.

One of their special characteristics is a 'brush-tipped' tongue, with which they take up nectar from flowers.

One of the smallest of the honeyeaters is the white-throated at only 14cm and weighs only 12 grams.

It is white under and has a black head with a white band that runs around the back of the head.

The eye has a pale blue crescent above and the eye itself is red.

The wings and tail are a rich olive colour.

They start breeding during the winter months and build a cup shaped nest from bark and grasses held together with spider's webs which is positioned in the fork of a tree.

Usually only two eggs are laid and both parents incubate the eggs and feed the young.

They are very cute and can be attracted to any garden with a bird bath.

They will come in quite regularly for a drink and a bath.

However, if you have a bird bath position it underneath a shrub which will provide them protection from predators.

The photo shows a bird feeding on a grass tree spear which has hundreds of small flowers and each one produces nectar.

Nectar is a sweet liquid produced by flowers which contains essential nutrients.

In mythology nectar is the fabled drink of the Greek gods that was supposed to make them immortal.

Good places to see this bird are at the Botanic Gardens, Baldwin Swamp Enviro Park, and Meadowvale Nature Park.

Allan Briggs is the secretary of BirdLife Capricornia, contact him with your birding questions at abriggs@irock.com.au

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