More commonly known for their inclusion in breakfast or brunch meals, baked beans at Wacol were employed in a vicious attack.
More commonly known for their inclusion in breakfast or brunch meals, baked beans at Wacol were employed in a vicious attack.

Baked beans 'revenge' attack led to more time in the can

A CAN of baked beans wrapped in a sock was used in a bizarre violent attack of "misplaced revenge".

Justin Benjamin Kussrow teamed up with another inmate at Wacol in 2016 to attack a man he believed abducted him as a child.

But the penalty handed down to Kussrow is now the subject of an appeal.

Kussrow previously appeared in an Ipswich court, and was in jail for armed robbery when he hatched the sock attack.

And at Brisbane District Court in November, he was jailed for a further six years and made ineligible for parole until June 2022.

On Tuesday, his barrister Deborah Holliday told Queensland Court of Appeal that sentence was manifestly excessive.

For the jailhouse attack, Kussrow had pleaded guilty to doing a malicious act with intent.

Ms Holliday said the sentence failed to properly take into account Kussrow's guilty plea.

She also said Kussrow's sentence could have been reduced or his parole eligibility date brought forward.

"Neither of those options occurred in this case," Ms Holliday said.

She also said the sentencing judge failed to properly take into account the sentence already imposed on Kussrow.

Ms Holliday said Kussrow only had one another conviction for violence, and that was an offence that "barely satisfied the requirements of an armed robbery".

The appeal court heard Kussrow had believed his target was a man who abducted him years earlier.

Kussrow's mother told him the target was not the person who harmed him as a 13-year-old, but Kussrow went ahead anyway.

For the jail attack, Kussrow pleaded guilty to malicious act with intent.

On Tuesday, Crown counsel MJ Wilson said the violence involved was "protracted" and a deed of "completely misplaced revenge".

She said the district court's Judge Brad Farr did consider Kussrow's personal circumstances.

Ms Wilson said Kussrow's fellow inmate used the "sock with a can of baked beans" and Kussrow plotted the attack.

A court previously heard Kussrow had struggled with post-traumatic stress disorder, learning issues and an attention deficit problem.

The appeal court reserved its decision. -NewsRegional